Summer Reading List for Critical Debate by Monica Amestoy

A great time to improve your literature base is during the summer. The following is a list of books I believe could be really helpful in debate both because of their critical quality and strategic because they are not yet super well known in high school LD. But mostly it’s a list of books I like.

Please add a comment about any books you are reading this summer that you think will be helpful to other debaters.

Borderlands by Gloria Anzaldua: This book teaches me something new every time I read it.  The way Anzaldua writes as well as what she says deconstructs a lot of the misconceptions that I think LD has about epistemology appeals to me. Anzaldua is a pioneer in Chicana feminism and critics most of the white feminism you see in high school debate. She is a great author for any kritikal debater.

The Future of Power by Joseph S. Nye Jr. is a must read for any debater interested in international relations.

A Cyborg Manifesto by Donna HarawayIf you’re interested in humanity, feminism, the machine, the animal, Bostrom or Deleuze this book is for you.  I think this book could be very applicable to  some of the possible topics for next year.

Becoming Animal by David Abram. This is a great book for those interested in phenomenology and environmental/ ecological issues. Never lose a deep eco debate again.

On Being White… And Other Lies by James Baldwin:  This is a great piece to help you understand “whiteness” and other critical arguments about race. Also it’s really short! http://www.cwsworkshop.org/pdfs/CARC/Family_Herstories/2_On_Being_White.PDF

Andrea Smith’s article “Heteropatriarchy and the Three Pillars of White Supremacy Rethinking Women of Color Organizing,” is another amazing intersectional read. http://loveharder.files.wordpress.com/2009/08/andrea-smith.pdf

Richard Delgado and Jean Stefancic’s article “Critical Race Theory” with a Foreword by Angela Harris is a really great start for those interested in critical race theory. Its full of good definitions and it often cited in its field.  http://www.odec.umd.edu/CD/RACE/CRT.PDF

  • Matt Zavislan

    If you haven’t already read it:
    Michel Foucault’s “The Birth of Biopolitics” is an incredibly good introduction to the poststructuralist method of critique and provides a pretty good foundation for everything that is horribly wrong with neoliberalism.